Collaborative Research

Our practice and methodology is based on a process of collaborative research. This is reflected the number of projects we have delivered which redefine established ideas of building use, enabling change from traditional working practices, and resulting in improved performance. The ACAD (Ambulatory Care and Diagnostics) building at Central Middlesex Hospital and Trumpington Community College are two examples of innovation in the field of education and health.

The process of collaborative research means listening and working with building users to seek out fresh ideas that are relevant to their needs. Visiting buildings, field trips, building physical and virtual prototypes, investigating user patterns – all of these activities enrich the journey towards great design.

Our approach in practice is supplemented by a body of theoretical work that forms Avanti’s contribution to a range of fields, whether in the form of publication, articles, teaching and debate.

Major publications authored by members of Avanti include ‘Integrating Care: The architecture of the comprehensive health centre’ by Justin DeSyllas and John Allan’s books influential books on Berthold Lubetkin including ‘Berthold Lubetkin: Architecture and the Tradition of Progress’. Our healthcare team was asked to author the new Hospitals section of the Metric Handbook published in February 2018.

Director Amir Ramezani contributes to the debate regarding London’s historic environment through membership of Historic England’s London Advisory Committee and director Claudia Bloom is an executive member of Architect’s for Health, helping to bring about change in healthcare environments.

Our commitment to research and development includes extensive work on technical innovation through development of modern methods of construction to drive improvements in quality and efficiency for our clients and construction partners.


TAGS

Collaborative Research, Our Ethos,


“Collaborative research drives innovation across our projects and has helped us redefine established ideas of building use”